Why so little info on the Gibson Axe?

Discussion in 'ESEE® Knives and Gear' started by Stray Round, Oct 29, 2020.

  1. Stray Round

    Stray Round Member

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    Interested in the Gibson Axe as a tool for light carving and to keep in a pack for bushcrafting, fires and shelter.

    I'm not finding much info and anything would be much appreciated.
     
  2. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    Excellent design. I actually tested the prototype that is essentially the same as the production. This is my son carving a spoon next to a can for size perspective.
    0EADA80A-2115-4649-8328-EFA86BB5C321.jpeg
     
  3. Strigidae

    Strigidae Moderator Staff Member

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  4. Caleb O

    Caleb O Member

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    I’ll take a crack at giving you a quick review. I’ve had one for quite a bit (serial number 0005) and have put it thru the paces. 2C875376-3DEE-4EEF-9935-EEB2778E9A23.jpeg First off, it isn’t a large hand axe by any stretch of the imagination. Hatchet would be a very accurate discerption though. It easily fits into nearly any daypack I own (HPG Tara, Mountainsmith Day Lumbar, Kavu Sling bag,etc). It is easily stashed and stowed internally or externally depending on preference. 39780916-2D40-45E1-8540-C4DB0EBED0C4.jpeg
    That being said, it’s a bit of a heavy guy. Pros are you’re never gonna break it (full tang) but this does mean the balance and feel will be a little different if you’re used to a regular wood handles hatchet. The ESEE Axe feels to me along a similar vein of the old Boy Scout full tang hatchets from years past. Overbuilt and utterly reliable. 56A4212D-3BE9-4DEB-B125-51D35971C3B0.jpeg The bit is different from a regular axe as well (full tang would be difficult to make as thick as a regular axe head without throwing in a huge distal tapper, which would be expensive). This will affect certain wood processing tasks, however, it excels at carving. F562D758-681C-48A2-A28F-251DD23CBC29.jpeg I’ve used the Gibson hatchet to carve out all sorts of items. From simple spoons and tent stakes, up to bowls and kuksas. And it just plain worked. 70C51AC5-99F6-48B8-9763-343C1A18C55E.jpeg 025A76A0-F586-4039-8E96-1C28623A56F4.jpeg Part of this is due just to the overall design. James Gibson as carved out more useable objects than most of us will in our lifetime. As such, this real world experience made it into the design of the hatchet, and it shows. I’m not even close to a expert when it comes to carving out cool wooden bowls, spoons, noggins, etc. but the hatchet is easy and lively in hand with multiple points to choke up or back off depending on what carving task you are trying to accomplish. Best part is....all these positions are comfortable to use, and make carving out your project straight forward as your knowledge allows. 634FF222-3AB7-480B-96E9-44ECA80A8FAA.jpeg If you’re looking for a very carryable hatchet for bushcraft around the campfire, general camp tasks, simple wood processing, that can be forced into other rolls; this is probably what you’re looking for. If you’re looking to fell a bunch of trees, and split a ton of wood; there are other options. My conclusion is that: I like it. At this point in time I see no reason (personally) to grab another small hatchet. As this one works for me and what I do. 30EC7F1E-4DCD-4DBB-9189-1FBDDEC5866C.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2020
    Axe, beestokk, KnOeFz and 10 others like this.

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