Training for failures

Discussion in 'Shooting & Fireams Training / Skills' started by Bcamos, Sep 20, 2016.

  1. Bcamos

    Bcamos Member

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    Damn I forgot about this thread.
     
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  2. Joelski

    Joelski Member

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    Post whore.
     
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  3. JAD

    JAD Member

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    You can always buy a crappy pistol and use it with cheap ammo.

    Example, my daughter bought a Ruger SR22. That gun is the proverbial lemon IMO. She doesn't want to be aggravated with shipping it back to Ruger so she just keeps using it for target practice at the indoor range. It chronically fails to feed, fails to eject, stovepipes, etc. So the last time I went shooting with her I cracked up watching her tap, rack, and pull the trigger. She doesn't even hesitate. Talk about training for failure.
     
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  4. Baldcutnut

    Baldcutnut Member

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    I bought one to teach my wife and daughter how to use a semi auto pistol and it is without a doubt very picky about ammo. I don't shoot it much unless they are around, I'm just not into 22's.
     
  5. JAD

    JAD Member

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    @Baldcutnut I was somewhat speaking tongue in cheek about buying a crappy gun. The Ruger my daughter bought is better described as "finicky" with regard to ammo that is used. My son has the same pistol and it shoots just fine. My real point is that if it happens all the time you actually get very instinctual about handling it without hesitation.

    I do think the 22's are awesome for introducing someone to shooting. I compare it to learning to drive a car and someone taking you straight to the highway and putting you in a full sized Suburban and telling you kick it up to 70 with a cheery "it is really fun to drive a car". Yeah right. Here's a .40 cal semi. You're going to love shooting.:eek:
     
  6. Joelski

    Joelski Member

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    Find the right .22 ammo and it'll work fine. I think just about everything pukes CCI.

    If the .22 works once the ammo problem is sorted, let her run with it. Less intimidating, more fun to shoot and faster back on target for a lot of people. A thoroughly pin-pricked heart or brain is far more final than a single half-ass wound with a .45 ACP.
     
  7. stickman

    stickman Member

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    Without getting into specifics, I am alive because of weapon failure drills. people who don't train for weapon failures (malfunctions and jams) are people who don't actually train.

    There are some nice tips in this thread, but as a firearm instructor for a few decades, I would add to have someone else load your magazine when you are working these types of drills. There is a difference.

    I would also encourage you to place a few pieces of tape on one side of your training magazine. I would hope that everyone trains to strip magazines, but in reality most shooters train with mags falling free, which isn't realistic.

    Lastly, work stress inoculation techniques. Most of the time I have found this easiest with two people working simple shooter coach drills. By training with stress, you are far ahead of the curve.

    If you have never had a weapon malfunction in a real life event, that is great, but don't count on every day being perfect, and don't think that if you are in a shooting you are going to be at your best. Quite commonly, as a civilian, it is going to be after you are already attacked, and possibly injured.

    Train hard, your life, your family, and those who need you may have to depend on your skills.
     

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