Locksport

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Kevo, Jan 25, 2019.

  1. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    Got a box full of pain today. From left to right: Abus 75 ec/marine, mul-t-lock junior, Sargent keso, and a freaking assa abloy twin 6000. 20190204_182757.jpg
     
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  2. OKcherokee

    OKcherokee Member

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    Considering everything you guys have been talking about that I don’t understand, what would be the hardest to pick padlock that one could buy to use?
     
  3. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    Do you have a price range you're thinking of?
     
  4. OKcherokee

    OKcherokee Member

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    No
     
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  5. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    Oh man, then the possibilities are endless! In all seriousness, most attacks on padlocks are going to be a cut shackle or a hammer to the lock body. I really like the abus ti80/50 for a nice beefy lock, and the smaller titaliums when you need a thinner shackle. Both options are under 20 bucks and reasonably difficult that someone won't be able to pick it without a pretty substantial amount of practice. If you wanted to spend some money then the medeco shrouded shackle locks are awesome. Just stay away from anything master lock makes.
     
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  6. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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  7. Mudman

    Mudman Member

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    @Kevo I drool over the Sargent Greenleaf stuff, those are so cool.

    Looks like you got a box of pain indeed. I've never tackled any dimple locks. Is the Mul-T-Lock a pin in pin?

    @OKcherokee +1 to what Kevo said. 99% of the criminals out there won't take the time to pick a lock, maybe a bump, bypass, or shim at best. Stay away from Any big box store branded locks as well at Masterlocks. Attack from criminals is almost always destructive in nature.

    What is it your trying to lock? Make sure that's also sturdy, it wouldn't help to have a high security lock, on lets say a picket fence or plastic storage shed that could be easily broken open.

    A step above Masterlock, that I've come to like- is the tactical series from Commando locks. They have a shackle guard that is very difficult to cut through, it's a little tricky to operate the first few times. But I like the added security of a shroud, it can also be removed if you wanted a standard lock.

    Another thing to consider with higher security locks, is the ease of getting a new key cut for spares. This can be both good and bad. Good in that a crook would have a harder time getting their hands on a limited access key. While on the other hand, it's bad if you have to drive an hour to get another key made. The place the I got my medeco from is walking distance from me, they have my name on file, so if I ever need a new one or lost mines- they have the code to cut a new one without need the original.

    Abus, American Lock, and Commando lock are what I'd look at for.

    If you got the money (not super practical) ASSA/Abloy, Medeco, Mul-T-Lock, Sargent Greenleaf would be my top choices. Abus also makes a higher end line, where you could put in the cores from the high security companies. Lots of options.
     
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  8. OKcherokee

    OKcherokee Member

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    I have nothing in mind.

    Figured most people just go to big box store and grab what’s on the shelf, so wondered what the options were.
    Pretty crazy stuff.
     
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  9. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    @Mudman solid advice sir!

    Yep the mul-t-lock is a pin in pin. I'm looking forward to trying them out. The keso is pretty cool too, 3 intersecting pin stacks across the top, side and bottom of the key way.
     
  10. Wisdom

    Wisdom Member

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    Some great comments and recommendations. I would add to the discussion that more locks are better. Most can be breached fairly easily. Adding two locks to one or three to one makes it a bit harder to breach. Also, the mental aspect of seeing multiple locks. However, it could also imply something of value is enclosed in the area.
     
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  11. Mudman

    Mudman Member

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    I have mixed feelings about more than 1 lock. @ is about max to me, because multiple locks, also lets a wood be crook know "this house with 3+ locks is more valuable than the one with just 1 lock"

    Really our job, is to slow them down. They'll get in with enough determination.

    Going back to destructive breaching, My cousin once had her house broken into in Texas. They didn't bother with the lock, even though it was cheap. But rather they used one of the weirder methods I've heard about. They use a come-along hand ratchet winch, to peel the corner of a steel security door open like a banana. Terrible method, and slow, but they did it.

    Lets say you have an excellent door and lock system. Well I've read of another story, where the burglars just kicked in the front wall a couple feet away from the doors edge. While for some reason, leaving the windows alone.

    Anywho, this particular type of topic really intrigues me.
     
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  12. Mudman

    Mudman Member

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    I wonder what kind of longevity these types of locks have against desert areas with wind and sand.

    Sounds like a lock rodeo.
     
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  13. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    Good question. I could imagine anything in that environment would have a reduced lifespan. This time of year we run into issues with locks getting iced up, so kind of the opposite problem haha.
     
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  14. Mudman

    Mudman Member

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    I'm sure some crazy guy/woman has made a custom wool sweater for locks. You know, to keep them from freezing. haha
     
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  15. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    I've put 2 hours on picking the mul-t-lock. No opens so far. I keep oversetting the inner pins.
     
  16. Mudman

    Mudman Member

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    Have you found a sequence for it yet? Like inner or outer pins first
     
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  17. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    as a former bike courier in the bike theft capital of the world (Vancouver), ABUS Discus locks (the BIG ones) with 15MM grade 80 or grade 100 chain were the lock of choice around here. A smaller 5/16" grade 70 transport chain and ABUS Discus lock were used for securing the front wheel to the frame.

    Kryptonite locks , even the New York Lock , were garbage. 15 seconds to bust them.

    we used 2 to 4 hose clamps around our wheel skewers, and red loctite on the screws, then wrapped the entire skewer and hose clamps in heavy black tape. (this would slow down the thieves by about 20 minutes, preventing them from stealing wheels. Handlebar/stem/seat/crank bolts had 1/4" ball bearings dropped into the allen bolt heads, and these were epoxied or JB welded over to prevent removal (headset bearing greasing was done by removing the headset cups, drilling a tiny hole, re-assembling the front end prior to JB welding the stems and handlebars - greasing was done daily with a needle nose grease gun. Old inner tubes wrapped over the headset bearings kept water and grit out.) . 2 Old shortened bike chains were weaved thru the rear of the frame and thru the seat then pinned with a chain tool to prevent seat theft.

    Smart couriers (old timers) would lock their bikes to the 12" lamp standards and NOT the bike racks <<<(easy to cut, 15 to 20 seconds)

    I couriered for YEARS on a very expensive Rocky Mountain Blizzard (1990 era) , still have it. In winter I used a cheap mountain bike with huge touring fenders. Some of my former workmates rode $5000 titanium mountain bikes for work and then later would rip the North Shore. You would not know the bikes were high end, not with all the hockey tape and stickers and inner tubes wrapped around them....LOL

    not related much to lock sport but related to locks and best way to prevent loss. Our locks were not picked (except the round cylinder krptyo locks - with a soft bic pen housing jammed in and turned) , but rather were brute force broken (prybars, car jacks, long pipes with slots cut into them, or grinders and cut off wheels. To a lesser extent some thieves used cryo methods (liquid nitrogen) to freeze the lock then they just hit them with hammers)
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019
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  18. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    @Mudman I've figured out that it is definitely all outer pins first, then back through the inners separately. I don't have much of a feel for, or a good understanding of these dimple picks yet. So that's probably slowing me down.

    @Bushman5 that's super interesting! I've been watching some lockpicking lawyer videos where he tests a bunch of bike locks against various destructive methods. The kryptonites don't seem to fare well lol.

    Outside of picking itself, I'm always super interested in locks in general, their use and physical security/bypassing and preventing bypass.
     
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  19. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    i like this one from him:

    LockPickingLawyer, a recreational lock picker, was sent a fingerprint padlock for review. He emailed the manufacture to let them know that he'd discovered a security vulnerability: "Upon examining the lock, I found that if you remove the three screws, the lock falls apart. The shackle can be opened and relocked without the owner's fingerprint or knowledge."

    The manufacturer replied: "the lock is invincible to the people who do not have a screwdriver."

    o_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_Oo_O

    Dfq_-FAW0AE4nd3.jpg
     
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  20. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    Some of these companies are amazing. It's like, someone along the development process had to have noticed that, right?
     
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