Experience with SWAT-T Tourniquets?

Discussion in 'Wilderness and Tactical Healthcare Management' started by 5col, Dec 2, 2016.

  1. 5col

    5col Moderator Staff Member

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    Does anyone here have experience using or evaluating SWAT-T tourniquets? If so, please share.
     
  2. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't have any "real world" experience, but I do like the fact that the design is dummy proof as far as doubling as a pressure dressing support (happy face GTG/oval too tight). I can also see some significant use with neurotoxic envenomations. I have concerns regarding looping with one hand and actual compression over gear, etc. if significant body fluids are present. I can't provide you with facts though, until I actually do some testing and research the data.

    Do you have any in stock? Price?
     
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  3. 5col

    5col Moderator Staff Member

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    We don't stock them right now, but NAR has them for $10.50/ea.

    The Naval Medical Research Unit in San Antonio has an ongoing evaluation of tourniquets that has not been kind to the SWAT-T (or the TK-4). I also got some feedback from a paramedic who has experience with them.

    The upshot so far seems to be:
    1) They can break.
    2) One-handed self-application is difficult.
    3) They are inconsistent at occlusion for leg injuries, especially for adults with muscular thighs.
    4) They work well for pediatric use.
    5) Two different sources say that tactical professionals are willing to carry the SWAT-T because it's compact and lightweight, where they will often opt not to carry other styles of tourniquet. (The CAT seems plenty compact to me, so I'm not so sure about this.)

    I've seen some instances where qualified people seemed to really like them, but haven't found a lot of supporting information that strongly recommends the SWAT-T.

    We care a lot about what we sell, and I hate the idea of offering an inadequate tourniquet.
     
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  4. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    My concerns also. I have not opened a new one and tested it, but a used one on me as a dummy failed to significantly reduce popliteal pulses vs 100% with a SOFT.
     
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  5. mtngoat

    mtngoat Member

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    At the Ditch medicine class I was told they are not effective by several medical and rescue professionals because that's the one I carried. I switched to the RATS, manly incase I have to use it on a small framed person or child.
     
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  6. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    are the SWAT-T the same as the CAT-T?
     
  7. mtngoat

    mtngoat Member

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    No they are the ones that are just a stretchy band you have to pull tight. The CAT-T are good to use if your using them on yourself.
     
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  8. tangomike3

    tangomike3 Member

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    Anyone familiar with the RATS? IFAK i just got from MyMedic had one. Always used CAT in the past.
     
  9. mtngoat

    mtngoat Member

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    Just got a RATS they work great for small framed people and kids (god forbid I ever have to use one on a kid). Hugh Coffee spoke highly of them at Ditch Medicine which is what lead me to them. I am currently trying to get my company to switch to them instead of the SWAT-T's we have now.
     
  10. tangomike3

    tangomike3 Member

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    Watched the videos and read some reviews. Just hate to do all the repetitive retrain. It' s harder when you get older. The retraining.
     
  11. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    thank you...i recently invested a LOT of CDN $ on some.
     
  12. Lowery399

    Lowery399 Member

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    Just my .02 on the matter and I should say that I'm not a medical professional and have limited experience in the area with no real world application, just my own biased opinions. I've been developing our tourniquet program for the last few years and we ultimately went with with CAT and continue to use them. The biggest reason, in my opinion at the time, was that the CAT just seemed to be easier to put on myself and those I spoke with about them so we have been issuing those out for the last few years.

    In August of last year I went to some medical training where we extensively used the CAT and the SOFTT-W for three days because these are the two models that had been approved by the committee on TCCC because they both have a strap, a stick and a way to lock it in place. With each of them I found advantages and disadvantages but nothing I found was the best of both worlds. In a perfect situation I would like to have all of them, the CAT, RAT, SOFFT-W and the SWAT-T because I feel that each of them possess advantages. The CAT, I feel, is still the easiest of them to put on when there is an injury to the arm so I really like it for that. The SOFFT-W seems to be easier and more "heavy duty" for application to a leg injury. The RAT seems to be simple to use and we did have some hands on with it but less so than the other two. The SWAT-T is great because of its size but as DJ said it really doesn't, again in my opinion, the compression that would be necessary for a heavy bleed but it would be great for a pressure dressing.

    I hope that helps some of you but the best bet is to just try them out and find which one works best for you. Don't be afraid to buy some of the ones you're interested in and then use them. For those of you that gained something from what I've said then I hope it helps. For those of you that disagree with me or have seen something better then lets discuss it. Thanks!
     
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  13. 5col

    5col Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks all for the input! Our family first aid kits all contain CATs, although only one in each and it seems that a lot of people are calling for two to be applied by default with adult leg injuries.

    I had inquired with the SWAT-T people but I don't think we're going to move forward with them. It's nothing against their product. At the end of the day, I've had some training in applying the CAT, and the feedback on the latest version of the CAT is positive and consistent.
     
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