Unhealthy survival

Discussion in 'Wilderness and Tactical Healthcare Management' started by Drew RedBear, Feb 23, 2020.

  1. Drew RedBear

    Drew RedBear Member

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    There are those of us that aren't in the best of health but still like to camp, hike, or just get out. But what if a situation arises that we get lost, injured, or for whatever reason have to survive? What if we can't carry a lot? What are some essentials that we should think about carrying that won't overload our weight limit? For example:
    What to pack in a first aid kit
    What knife to bring
    Specific foods (dependant on health, like for diabetics)
    Extra clothing (season dependant)
    Etc....

    For me, I have type 2 diabetes and heart disease and I have stints (if that matters).
    Are there any good books or readings for such things?
     
  2. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    I'm sure there are lots if guys with better advice than me, so take it for what you paid lol.

    Meds are a big one. At least a days worth of your regular rx stuff is good to have handy for an unexpected stay anywhere. If you take blood thinners, then even minor cuts can become a big problem. Bleeding control is something to prioritize in your kit then.

    Communication and access to call for help is also a big thing. I know nobody wants to feel like they have a life alert, but a plb or gps like the inreach can make a huge difference. Here is a great example:

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/23/us/washington-runner-injured-crawled-eight-hours/index.html

    This guy broke his leg on a trail and had to crawl 6 miles to get into cell phone range. He could have cut his rescue time down significantly with a gps distress call.
     
  3. Kaw-liga

    Kaw-liga Member

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    I'm sure I could think of a laundry list of crap that I pack. But Kevo hit on a really important one to me. That's bleeding control. I have a small red pack on the back of my main bag. It has nothing but bleeding control supplies. My less critical "boo boo box" lives in my shoulder bag in case I get a small cut, scrape, sting, or headache. I kayak and camp into some more remote areas where I'm at and I spend a lot of time swinging an axe or machete in the process. I've been seriously contemplating getting a plb, also something Kevo mentioned. I've also been wanting some training. My question for ESEE in the Izula II GAW thread was asking if they plan to do a wilderness medicine course this year. I could use it.
     
  4. Drew RedBear

    Drew RedBear Member

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    Thank you both. I am on blood thinners so that's definitely a concern. I have a small ifak but nothing for clotting blood so I'll add that to it as well. I usually take all my meds with me also, because if I get pulled over there may be an issue lol. Plus I like to know I'm covered that way. I was thinking of looking into a GPS but I D thinking maybe a two way radio also? Maybe as a back up.
     
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  5. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    Identifying hypoglycemia, which most diabetics are masters at doing, would be a priority. Increased activity can certainly put you in that state. Cool, pale and diaphoretic should signal you to test blood sugar on the trail and of course have a contingency plan.
    Hyperglycemia typically wouldn’t be a concern. Wound management skills due to anticoagulant therapy is a given.
     
  6. Drew RedBear

    Drew RedBear Member

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    You make some valid and important points here. I don't test my sugar levels on a regular basis as I should, but being in a situation it will definitely be more imperative to check .
     
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  7. FAL'ER

    FAL'ER Member

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    I keep a couple of Starbucks Honey packets around almost always.
    I was camping on an Island in central Oregon with a guy who had just been diagnosed with diabetes and the medicine he was taking lowered his blood sugar too much. He went back to his tent feeling sick and a little while later I hear him asking for a spoon full of honey.
    I guess it did what he wanted because he was up and around in no time.
    I don't understand all the science and microbiology of it all.
    Those packets don't take up much space in a kit.
     
  8. Drew RedBear

    Drew RedBear Member

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    That's actually a really good idea, thank you.
     
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  9. C99c

    C99c Member

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    If you don't have access to the honey packets or want to use local honey instead for the added benefits it's super easy to store them in a section of sealed drinking straw just like people do with spices or tinder.
    I keep some in both my hiking and running/biking kits for a quick snack or to add to coffee.
     
  10. Drew RedBear

    Drew RedBear Member

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    That's also a great idea. I think there's a local honey farm nearby so I'll check them out.
     
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