Show me your axes!

Discussion in 'Knives, Gear, Guns And Other Tools' started by Klynesquatch, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    885
    Likes Received:
    1,439
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Maine
    Generally those would also be known as a broad hatchet, and could be found in double bevel and single bevel varieties in varying sizes. Flat topped carpenter's hatchets are often called "half-hatchets" because they're essentially a broad hatchet with the top half cut off.
     
    JMJ likes this.
  2. JMJ

    JMJ Member

    Messages:
    923
    Likes Received:
    1,156
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    A better place!!!!
    Thanks for the info, I've often wondered what they were really called. The whole culture I grew up in around here is very much into repurposing tools.

    What are the main uses for the broad hatchet, especially one this small? I had always assumed they were for working with wooden shingles.
     
    FortyTwoBlades likes this.
  3. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    885
    Likes Received:
    1,439
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Maine
    They were a sort of general woodworking design used for tasks ranging from household utility chopping to rough shaping work with carpentry and the like. They're good for making controlled cuts, in general, especially when you're looking to leave a good flat surface.
     
    JMJ likes this.
  4. JMJ

    JMJ Member

    Messages:
    923
    Likes Received:
    1,156
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    A better place!!!!
    Cool thanks man I definitely appreciate the feedback! I think it'll go into my tool box instead of sitting in my muzzleloader gear. You'd definitely get a kick out of how they're used here. When I was doing biological sampling for the state's fisheries service it was probably our most used tool dredging the oyster samples.
     
    FortyTwoBlades likes this.
  5. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    885
    Likes Received:
    1,439
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Maine
    Oyster hatchets in specific are a subset of broad hatchets. They're basically just a tiny version of one.
     
    JMJ likes this.
  6. KMCMICHAEL

    KMCMICHAEL Member

    Messages:
    788
    Likes Received:
    1,510
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Irving, Tx
    Gents, I know this is not my business but if civility had prevailed and simpler terms used it could have been a very informative thread to those of us less theoretical about axes. You could have had the satisfaction of educating me and the other unwashed.

    Why not ask for a volunteer panel of three axe users to test each other's theory in the hands of more objective users?

    I cannot volunteer as I am currently attending save the world training in Maryland.

    To poll or not to poll, that is the question...
     
  7. Theodore

    Theodore Member

    Messages:
    1,575
    Likes Received:
    2,523
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Maine
    Here is a video of Woodtrekker explaining it

    Here it is put simply if you are interested.


    http://www.swingingsteel.com/american-felling-axe-guide/
    What is an American Felling Axe?
    The development of the American Felling axe parallels that of the Hudson Bay axe and the designs are similar in the sense that they both evolved away from the European head designs that they originated with. The early European head designs were forged from a single piece of metal ‘wrapped’ into a round eye with no poll. This resulted in two less-than desirable features.

    First, the lack of a poll meant that the head was bit-heavy and not well balanced. Swinging the axe hard resulted in wobbling with diminished accuracy. The second problem was the narrow head of the cutting edge widened abruptly into the round eye and prevented the ax from driving deep into a cut or getting wedged into notches.

    As the American felling ax and the shorter Hudson Bay ax evolved the heads became narrower creating a tool that could plunge deep into a cut, and be easily removed. This narrow design created the oval shaped eye most commonly seen on modern axes. On some designs the cheeks were fluted which changed the cheek surface area to help prevent sticking in the cut.

    The next substantial change was the addition of a poll on the back of the head. This greatly improved the balance of the axe, smoothed the swing and provided additional weight for driving cuts. The typical head weight was 2.5 – 3.5 pounds making an axe that was tough enough to topple trees but of a reasonable size to pack into the woods. Some felling axes were designed with a “double bit” head to provide two cutting profiles one for chopping and one for limb work or for work close to the ground where a more durable profile was necessary.

    The handle length varied but ended up somewhere in the 28-36 inch range and access to the resilient and tough American Hickory wood provided a perfect complement to the new designs. The hickory was rigid and durable enough to work in the new slimmer eye that the narrow felling axe head demanded. The handles were also made with a curve for added grip and control when swinging which greatly improved handling.

    If any axe can be considered a jack of all trades, it’s the American felling axe; built to drop trees but light enough for smaller jobs and reasonable to pack around. If you can only buy one axe, choosing a quality felling axe is a smart move.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2016
    Dagwood likes this.
  8. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    885
    Likes Received:
    1,439
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Maine
    Had you seen this link? It contains what I've currently written on the matter. As far as to make use of a poll or not, I say either works fine and it's a matter of if the sum of the axe's parts is suitable for the context of use you intend for it. :)

    Edit: forgot a word in there!
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2016
    JAD and JMJ like this.
  9. chorpie

    chorpie Member

    Messages:
    621
    Likes Received:
    821
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    California
    I know a tomahawk isn't really an axe, but... it's there. :)

    Cold Steel Trail Boss and Frontier Hawk

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Delkancott

    Delkancott Member

    Messages:
    2,410
    Likes Received:
    3,964
    Location:
    SEMA
    I have some axes to grind. #nopix
     
    JAD and FortyTwoBlades like this.
  11. The Warrior

    The Warrior Member

    Messages:
    1,336
    Likes Received:
    3,054
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Illinois
    Is the Trail Boss any good? I've read conflicting reports.
     
  12. Theodore

    Theodore Member

    Messages:
    1,575
    Likes Received:
    2,523
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Maine
     
    Dagwood likes this.
  13. chorpie

    chorpie Member

    Messages:
    621
    Likes Received:
    821
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    California
    I like it, but that being my only axe - I have nothing to compare it against. I'll say that it came pretty dull, and I had to put some work in with the file to get it to where I liked it. But again, nothing to compare against... besides the tomahawk.

    I'm sure there are tons of better axes, but that one cost me $30. Eventually i'll get something nicer, but seeing as I have extremely limited time to get into the woods these days, I haven't been too worried about it.
     
    The Warrior likes this.
  14. The Warrior

    The Warrior Member

    Messages:
    1,336
    Likes Received:
    3,054
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Illinois
    I've always admired the looks of it.
     
  15. chorpie

    chorpie Member

    Messages:
    621
    Likes Received:
    821
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    California
    I'll admit that was half the deciding factor when I got it. the other half was the price :)
     
    The Warrior likes this.
  16. The Warrior

    The Warrior Member

    Messages:
    1,336
    Likes Received:
    3,054
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Illinois
    Yeah, the price is very reasonable.
     
  17. Sheepdog

    Sheepdog Member

    Messages:
    461
    Likes Received:
    522
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Polk County, FL
    [​IMG]
     
    chorpie likes this.
  18. chorpie

    chorpie Member

    Messages:
    621
    Likes Received:
    821
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    California
  19. Sheepdog

    Sheepdog Member

    Messages:
    461
    Likes Received:
    522
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Polk County, FL
    Ugh
     
    chorpie likes this.
  20. Southern Gent

    Southern Gent Member

    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    200
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Atlanta
    Someone is going to have a NICE Christmas when they receive this Hoffman 12" miniature campers axe. Big knife replacement is an egregious understatement with this axe.

    FullSizeRender.jpg
     

Share This Page