Fire Dept Story

Discussion in 'Wilderness and Tactical Healthcare Management' started by indulf, Dec 16, 2016.

  1. indulf

    indulf Member

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    Names / locations withheld to protect patients / comply with HIPAA

    2 saturdays ago my wife called me after she left the house with our kids. She saw someone laying in the driveway of a house, pants down, not moving.

    For background, I am a Firefighter in my community. My wife is as well, but not knowing the situation she didn't feel comfortable stopping alone and with our kids in the car. I grabbed my kit, my coat, my radio, and booked it to the location she noted. It was approx. 33deg F outside.

    I walked up the driveway and stopped about 15' away to make sure there wasn't any danger or perhaps a crime scene I didn't want to contaminate. The patient wasn't moving, and a small dog was over there messing around, sniffing at his head. After 15-20sec of observation I saw him shiver, and without any indication of any other dangers I made my way over to him. The little dog was white, and when he turned around he looked like Cujo.. The patient had a wound on the back of his head and was bleeding. The dog had been licking it up.

    I immediately got on the radio and called for the Sheriff and EMS. Checked pulse / airway. Stirred him up and realized he was incredibly, unbelievably drunk. Likely fell and hit his head while he was trying to take a leak.

    Two deputies rolled up and we carried him inside the house. Turned the heat on, wrapped him up in all the blankets we could find. No more than 3min later EMS arrived, took his temperature, and he was hypothermic. EKG showed some funny business too and he won a trip to the hospital.

    I found out later that upon arrival at the hospital his head was xrayed, anomalies found, and after a CT scan he was flown to another hospital for brain surgery. The fall caused a bleed and the guy may never be the same.

    My wife likely saved his life by having her eyes open and calling me to go check on him. She at least rescued some level of quality of life for the guy.

    Moral of the story - keep your eyes open. Don't be afraid to call in something strange if you see it - that's what we are here for, and you may save someone's life. Get some training, carry some basic supplies. If nothing else, carry some gloves so you can protect yourself.
     
    Stone, .357 mag, C99c and 4 others like this.
  2. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    amen to that!
     
  3. Stone

    Stone Member

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    This is precisely why I decided long ago that when I drink, I do so in the comfort of my own home, in a comfortable chair, close to the bathroom, with lots of known places to grab should I falter (chair backs, walls, door knobs, beautiful women, etc).

    OK, I jest. Not to make light of the valor that you and your wife demonstrated.

    I have another comment, but I'll save it for another time.
     
  4. indulf

    indulf Member

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    more to this story.

    - a few years ago someone smashed this guy in the back of the head with a bat.. almost killed him. that's going to be a good campfire story at the next gathering :)

    - i think he's back home. i heard another ems callout the week before Christmas to his house for a seizure. apparently he had a seizure issue after the aforementioned bat incident.. yikes.

    - heard through the rumor mill that he hasn't put the bottle down yet.

    - his girlfriend stopped by my house when we weren't home (my mom was there) and gave us some more background. she wants to meet me to say thanks. don't know how i feel about that... one thing i've learned in the Fire Service is that once it's over it's over. one of the ways i deal with all the stupid crap i see is to just forget about it when i leave. don't wonder and worry about patients, just move on. i don't really like continuing to think about this dude, but he is my neighbor.. what to do what to do.
     

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